Troubleshooting

English-German Bilingual Business Support and Troubleshooting

Customer Liaison, Bilingual B2B and B2C Support 

There is a client on the phone who sounds unhappy, but he has difficulty expressing his query in English? Let me telephone him on your behalf and find out exactly what the problem is and, possibly, how it could be rectified. I will then translate to English the outcome of our conversation, so you are fully informed.

Often a telephone call between people who speak the same language will sort out uncertainties much quicker and more efficiently than the most carefully devised and translated letter. Involving an impartial intermediary would also take the edge off the dialogue. What is more, it is less time-consuming and therefore more cost-effective than embarking into lengthy written translate to English discussions.

Providing Help where Needed

Your only German-speaking employee has just left or is on holiday. You need temporary help? Call me!

Doing more than Translate to English: Building Linguistic Bridges on your Behalf

There are times when you need someone who can do a little more than translate your documents to English or German.

Would it help if someone picked up the phone and spoke to the local authority in Austria who are sending you complicated messages? Or to the manager of the apartment owner's organisation in Switzerland who are disputing your commercial use of your holiday flat? Are you involved in a medical claim abroad? Have you had an employment-related medical accident? Would it make your life easier if someone could suggest where to get the right legal advice rather than just translate to English what even in the translated version make little sense to you?

Case Studies for Bilingual Business Support and Troubleshooting Services

Employment Law in Switzerland

One of my clients is a British construction company who sent a team of contractors to work on a Swiss building project. Following a Swiss inspection of the site and of the terms and conditions under which the company employed contractors, the company received an official letter. It informed them that they had to pay their contractors the same wages as a Swiss employee would be paid, as the inspection had shown that the British workers received a lower wage.

Initially I was employed to translate to English what the Swiss letter said. However, we soon discovered that the inspection process had not taken into account expenses and costs already paid in Britain and that indirect benefits had not been considered. After sorting out some misunderstandings by using my services as an intermediary, the company avoided being prosecuted and continues to send contractors to Switzerland. They were so pleased they recommended another British construction firm with the same problem to me.

Selling an Austrian Owned House in the UK 

Another one of my clients is an estate agent with an unusual problem. They are trying to sell a house with a charge in the Land Register in favour of an elderly lady who now lives in a nursing home in Austria. Her (German-speaking) solicitor is her legal guardian. Although the solicitor signed all the relevant papers and sent in many documents to prove that she is the authorised representative of the client in question, there is no guarantee that the British Land Register will accept these documents. The prospective buyer of the property is naturally concerned, because he may be signing a binding legal contract while risking that the Land Register will not agree to removing the charge on completion of the sale. This is a complex legal situation that is not yet resolved. I have spent many hours discussing the possible ways forward with the estate agent and the Austrian lawyer and liaising between the two. So, rather than translate a stream of complex documents to English, by making personal contact with the people involved I saved my client unnecessary costs.

Assisting in a Negligence Claim 

I spent 18 months assisting a solicitor with a negligence claim after a client had sustained major and life changing injuries in an industrial accident abroad. This included translating medical reports but also earning history, projections of lost income and personal impact statements. I frequently spoke to the injured party to discuss their future career prospects, qualifications they had to obtain to remain employed, their likely future medical needs, the necessary adaptations to their house etc.

Professional bilingual support and direct contact with the solicitor and the overseas injured party made the process quicker and more efficient.

In Conclusion

Whatever your personal circumstances are and whatever bilingual business support and troubleshooting assistance you might need, don't hesitate to ask. Chances are I can help you solve your problem and save you having to pay for unnecessary translations!

For a selection of other English-German translation services I offer, please visit